March Reading:

Pale Horse, Pale Rider by Katherine Ann Porter

“Look, don’t be afraid, it is nothing, it is only eternity.”

This short story is autobiographical in nature, Katherine Ann Porter having also survived the 1918 Influenza Pandemic. She is one of the few writers to write specifically of this time and also wrote the most dramatic narrative of what it was like to be ill with the flu.  Katherine’s illness was so severe that it permanently turned her hair white, a lasting souvenir of the Pandemic.

Main character Miranda quickly becomes ill, losing her grip on reality while ironically, sharpening her senses: 

“It’s as bad as anything can be,” said Adam, “all the theaters and nearly all the shops and restaurants are closed, and the streets have been full of funerals all day and ambulances all night —“

“But not one for me,” said Miranda, feeling hilarious and lightheaded.

Miranda walks around in an influenzal miasma, soon passing from waking nightmare into a whirling delirium of clarity:

Miranda sighed, and lay back on the pillow and thought, I must give up, I can’t hold out any longer. There was only that pain, only that room, and only Adam. There were no longer any multiple planes of living, no tough filaments of memory and hope pulling taut backwards and forwards holding her upright between them. There was only this moment and it was a dream of time, and Adam’s face, very near hers, eyes still and intent, was a shadow, and there was to be nothing more….”

The title quote comes from the Book of Revelation:

And I looked, and behold, a pale horse. And its rider’s name was Death, and Hades followed him. And they were given authority over a fourth of the earth, to kill with sword and with famine and with pestilence and by wild beasts of the earth.

Ironically, the 1918 Influenza Pandemic struck a quarter of the world’s population at the time, 500 million. It killed 50-100 million.

No need to go to the library to check this one out, stay home and stay healthy. Here’s a link to the text:

Pale Horse, Pale Rider at archive.org

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