The November Online Book Choice Is:

Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi

persepolis book jacket

Satrapi’s autographic (or autobiographix or graphic memoir: the language is still being worked out) is a snapshot of what life was like in Iran before, during, and after the Islamic Revolution, with a historical overview thrown in.

This autographic is worth the read, though it’s difficult to see why Satrapi wishes to justify her country when so much injustice is happening there, in this century and the last. This is from the introduction:
‘Since then, this old and great civilization has been discussed mostly in connection with fundamentlaism, fanaticism, and terrorism. As an Iranian who has lived more than half my life in Iran, I know that this image is far from the truth…I believe that an entire nation should not be judged by the wrongdoings of a few extremists.’

The basis of the 1979 Islamic Revolution was Iran’s rejection of the Shah and his western-backed support. Ironically, the western education and influences that Satrapi’s family and other Iranians enjoyed during the Shah’s rule were now outlawed. With no benefit of hindsight, Iranians traded a puppet Shah for an extremist government. Iran became a male-dominated theocracy and women became subordinate to men. Women were not oppressed under the rule of the Shah.

Depressingly, not much has changed since the 1980s. Sure, living in Iran is great if you’re a guy and you don’t question authority. For a woman? Here is a case in point: wearing the hijab has become a symbol of oppression instead of a modest Islamic custom. In Iran, within the last month, four women had acid thrown at them for not following the strict dress code. Their attackers are still at large and little progress is being made to find them. Link here for the news article.

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