The May Online Book Choice Is:

Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare

Much Ado folio

Though Hero and Claudio’s story is the main plot of the play, Beatrice and Benedick steal the show with their lively bantering, engaging in a war of words with each other. It’s elevated language, used by the master of all writers.

Beatrice: I wonder that you will still be talking, Signior Benedick. Nobody marks you.

Benedick: What, my dear Lady Disdain! are you yet living?

Beatrice: Is it possible Disdain should die while she hath such meet food to feed it as Signior Benedick? Courtesy itself must convert to Disdain if you come in her presence.

Benedick: Then is courtesy a turncoat. But it is certain I am loved of all ladies, only you excepted; and I would I could find in my heart that I had not a hard heart, for truly I love none.

Beatrice: A dear happiness to women! They would else have been troubled with a pernicious suitor. I thank God and my cold blood, I am of a humor for that. I had rather hear my dog bark at a crow than a man swear he loves me.

One of the better editions to read is the Pelican Shakespeare. It’s annotated well, with nicely written essays. And the library’s Overdrive digital catalog offers an audio copy of BBC Radio Shakespeare’s production of the play. Playwrights prefer their plays to be seen rather than read, but, in our time, it’s nice to read the play first to get the gist of the story, then watch (or listen) to the play being performed.

BBC radio Much Ado

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