The March Online Book Choice Is:

The Falcon : a narrative of the captivity and adventures of John Tanner

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John Tanner was kidnapped by the Shawnee when he was 9 years old and was subsequently raised in an Ojibwe family. His narrative was published in 1830.

The book is straightforward, diary-fashion of day-to-day life. It could be a little banal but for the fact that his life was completely difficult. Tanner and his Ojibwe family were survivors and many, many days were spent looking for food and protecting themselves from the elements. And the struggles of alcoholism are present. When Tanner would bring in pelts to sell for goods, his mother, Net-no-kwa would inevitably sell some for alcohol to escape her situation.

Tanner became a guide in later years, which is how his story gained interest. He mysteriously disappeared in 1846.

The following scene is Tanner nearly succumbing to freezing weather:

‘Early one morning about mid-winter, I started an elk. I pursued until night, and almost overtaken him, but hope and strength failed me at the same time. What clothing I had on me, notwithstanding the extreme coldness of the weather, was drenched with sweat. It was not long after I turned towards home that I felt it stiffening about me…I was conscious I was somewhat frozen, before I arrived at the place where I had left our lodge standing in the morning, and it was now midnight. I knew it had been the old woman’s (Net-no-kwa) intention to move, and I knew where she would go, but I had not been informed she would go on that day. As I followed on their path, I soon ceased to suffer from cold, and felt that sleepy sensation which I knew preceded the last stage of weakness in such as die of cold. I redoubled my efforts, but with an entire consciousness of the danger of my situation, it was with no small difficulty that I could prevent myself from lying down. At length I lost all consciousness for some time, how long I cannot tell, and awaking as from a dream, I found I had been walking round and round in a small circle…After the return of my senses, I looked about to try to discover my path, but while I was looking, I discovered a light at a distance by which I directed my course. Once more, I lost my senses, but I did not fall down. If I had, I should never have got up again…’

This book is available for loan through Prospector.

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