The March Online Book Choice Is:

My Struggle: Book 1 by Karl Ove Knausgaard

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My Struggle is a rough, humorous, and strangely mesmerizing read. Knausgaard wrote Book 1 in 2009 and followed it with five more volumes. Not just for that reason, Knausgaard is compared to Proust. No doubt, the epic nature of his 6 volume work mirrors Proust’s In Search of Lost Time. They both write of autobiographical events and shape them into a novel, or rather, multiple novels.

The book is not an autobiography, and Knausgaard states in an interview:
“I was never after representing episodes from my life, which an autobiography does but rather to search a life for meaning. My life was just the raw material.”
Abend, Lisa. “Norway’s Proust.” Time 183.21 (2014): 50-52. Academic Search Premier. Web. 1 Mar. 2016.

Recounting all the minutiae in a life. Why isn’t it boring to read? The language he uses is straight and to the point, nothing fancy, nothing that sings, and he recalls moments big and small and recalls them both in the same manner. Most of our days don’t sing. Most days are filled with physical or emotional difficulties, or with nothing at all. Same old, same old. To write of this in a direct manner and to keep the reader from putting the book down is a great accomplishment.

Here is Karl Ove, contemplating:

As I sit here writing this, I recognize that more than thirty years have passed. In the window before me I can vaguely make out the reflection of my face. Apart from one eye, which is glistening, and the area immediately beneath, which dimly reflects a little light, the whole of the left side is in shadow. Two deep furrows divide my forehead, one deep furrow intersects each cheek, all of them as if filled with darkness, and with the eyes staring and serious, and the corners of the mouth drooping, it is impossible not to consider this face gloomy.
What has engraved itself on my face?

You won’t read this book and have your breath taken away by his words, but you might have it taken away nonetheless. It is worth the read. On to Book 2.

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