The February Online Book Choice Is:

Barefoot in Baghdad by Manal Omar

Barefoot in Baghdad
Manal Omar was the liaison for a humanitarian organization that was headquartered in Baghdad in 2003 at the beginning of Iraq’s civil unrest. This book chronicles her work and life there.

Omar is an idealist and works purposefully to help the women who are on the outskirts of Iraqi society. These are the widows, single mothers, the abused, the rape victims, any women that carry a stigma. It is difficult work in a male hierarchical society, not to mention a war zone. Her fellow workers in other aid organizations see the futility when Omar tries to see solutions. This from an orphanage director:

‘Manal, you need to understand that we are tired of fighting,’ Asma said. ‘That’s all I have been doing; it’s all my mother did. We don’t want to fight anymore. It doesn’t mean we have given up. Far from it. It just means we want to find a more peaceful way to live something that may resemble a normal life.’

And Omar:

During my six months in Iraq I had met with women from a wide range of backgrounds. Although their circumstances were different, they all had in common the fact that they wanted to share their stories. And a common thread in those stories, a thread repeated in almost all my interviews with Iraqi women across the county, was that idea. They were the words that bridged the gap between rich and poor, literate and illiterate, and ethnic and religious: ta’abna (we are tired) and malayna (we have had enough)…..My strategy was to remain focused on the individuals in front of me. I convinced myself that if I could help one, two, perhaps even ten women, then I had fulfilled my role. I had become so focused on maintaining an optimistic viewpoint that perhaps I had lost perspective.

When international aid workers began to be kidnapped and murdered in Iraq, then everything fell apart in terms of helping the Iraqis. Sides were drawn, between Sunni, Shia, and the occupying American forces. And the unrest kept growing until Omar became completely overwhelmed by it. There was no escape for those who lived there and it became impossible for Omar to lend a helping hand to them. Most depressingly, given the current state of affairs in the Middle East, are her following lines:

At the same time, the number of my Iraqi friends now settling in Amman began to increase. Even more of them headed to Syria. We all waited for the end of 2004 with the belief that 2005 would bring some new promise.

Manal Omar currently works for the United States Institute of Peace, Middle East and Africa branch.

Since this book was published in 2010 and Iraq and the surrounding countries have disintegrated under the rise of ISIS, here is a good way to keep up on your current events. The Salida Library offers a host of foreign policy periodicals you can read online through our Ebscohost databases, which are available with a quick login of your library card. Use the Academic Search Premier to find Foreign Affairs’ Nov/Dec 2015 issue which is dedicated to ‘The Post-American Middle East’ and Aaron David Miller’s article from American Foreign Policy Interests, ‘Gulliver’s Troubles: America in the Middle East’.

Map of Middle East

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